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Vancouver's First-Ever Temporary Modular Housing

In response to an immediate need to address the City of Vancouver’s housing affordability challenges as quickly as possible, Horizon North was selected by the Vancouver Affordable Housing Agency (VAHA) to complete the city’s first-ever temporary modular housing development. The innovative, three-story 14,785 square foot (sq. ft.) transitional housing building provides interim homes for residents on low and fixed-income.

The building features 40, 250 sq. ft. single occupancy suites with self-contained bathrooms and kitchens, individual climate control and a private living space. Four of the suites have been designed to accommodate people with accessibility requirements and feature customized layouts and user-friendly adaptive design. The central building features include communal indoor and outdoor amenity space, while the exterior façade features two murals by a local artist of the Wuikinuxv and Klahoose Nations, which reflect the history of the area.

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